Reviews from

Chestnut Yearling

A Chestnut Yearling Cold posed on a hill.

21 total reviews 
Comment from Mr Jones


is a lovely and top power shot. so tall and standing proud. the coat like a seal, wich is always a great sign of health and well being. such a lovely pose and the way you are looking up at this fine yearling. excellent form and structure, educational detail and such a keen eye. a perfect picture, covering all the key aspects of photography. great work Daphne..

 Comment Written 15-Oct-2018


reply by the author on 15-Oct-2018
    Thank you so much! For some reason this photo got completely overlooked in its contest in favor of what I thought were much simpler subject shots. I had a new Yashika film camera with a powerful zoom lens, but was mostly too busy to use it. I'll email you a couple more of Oriental Gold since you seem to grasp a few unusual things. For instance, even modern horsemen don't seem to grasp that it is the quality of feed that makes the coat look great, so instead even in summer, the Arab people body clip their show horses. I never needed to because I fed the best feed and supplements. The coat also reflects the health of the animal's digestion. A very wormy animal for instance, will show that condition from what I would call "worm hairs", which are scattered long, coarse hairs that appear along with the natural body coat. And so on!.... Congratulation on your knowledge (spontaneous insight?!) It was sad that this great animal did not end up so well, but I simply did not have the money to shelter him from a dangerous world. After leaving my crazy parent's I hoped to find this alternate world at a sophisticated level a bit more wholesome than I did, but as you say in one of your posts, nothing is quite black or white! To protect a fine animals and honor the expertise to manage it in a competitive world takes affluence I am afraid -- in my experience at least, and I always lived hand to mouth... Thanks for your insightful review! Daphne
Comment from MKFlood


good looking horse. the clarity is great. the capture of the light is great. the angle of the shot of this handsome horse is great. the image is balanced and eye appealing to the viewer. good eye and great job overall.

 Comment Written 19-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 20-Sep-2018
    Thank you so much Mark! Daphne Oberon
reply by MKFlood on 20-Sep-2018
    Shhhhhhhh!..when your in these blind contest do not sign your name on the response..if discovered they would disqualify you from them. Don't worry I ain't gonna tell but someone else might. Don't wanna see you see you miss out on this cool capture. Wink
reply by the author on 21-Sep-2018
    Oh yes, thanks! You know whoooo.... Don't sign may name and hope you remember who I am!
Comment from SunnyCreekHill


What a gorgeous photo of this yearly! I love the shiny coat and the straight stature that it has! The mane and tail are so perfect it almost looks like a stuffed item in a museum! Such a beautiful shot captured here...Well done!

 Comment Written 19-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 20-Sep-2018
    Thank you so much! I'll eventually post a picture of his dam...
Comment from helvi2


MY first glimpse of this horse was how beautiful he is. When you read the story behind the horse it breaks your heart. I think that story makes one see the horse even more majestically! I'm glad he had the chance to breed even if it was a short time! Thanks for sharing this wonderful image! :o) Helvi

 Comment Written 19-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 20-Sep-2018
    Thank you so much! I'll eventually post a picture of his dam...
Comment from Stringbean


Good artists notes and I like the storytelling with your image. An interesting perspective ....show casing the beauty of this gorgeous horse. Taken in good lighting with sharp focus revealing good details of the fur and mane of this gorgeous creature. I love the background showing the habitat of the horse ....with the blue sky and the fencing framed by the tree all compliments this photography. Thanks for sharing this story and photography.

 Comment Written 17-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 17-Sep-2018
    Thanks very much for your positive review. Eventually I will post a photo of this horse as an adult stallion, and perhaps a photo of his similar dam. Due to his athletic flexibility, the way he moved and large size for an Arabian, the nickname given him by observers became Red Dragon. Unfortunately, due to the shoulder injury, he developed structural deviations in both front legs which later photos show...
reply by Stringbean on 21-Sep-2018
    You are so very welcome Daphne!
    Mary Lynn
Comment from Envision


This is a beautiful animal and an interesting and extraordinary story. I really like the way his coat shines in the sun and the regal appearance of his stance. The photographer captured a great pose full of noble personality.

 Comment Written 17-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 17-Sep-2018
    Thanks very much for your positive review. Eventually I will post a photo of this horse as an adult stallion, and perhaps a photo of his similar dam. Due to his athletic flexibility, the way he moved and large size for an Arabian, the nickname given him by observers became Red Dragon. Unfortunately, due to the shoulder injury, he developed structural deviations in both front legs which later photos show...
Comment from El-mundo


A great story in the narrative of the 'against all odds' survival of this wonderful and graceful creature, standing boldly in the heat of the day, and captured from a great POV to show the sheen of the rich brown coat shimmering in the sun. Crisp clarity and good contrasting colours of the sky and trees beyond, with good DOF showing nice perspective too. A lovely piece, great work :)

 Comment Written 17-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 17-Sep-2018
    Thanks very much for your positive review. Eventually I will post a photo of this horse as an adult stallion, and perhaps a photo of his similar dam. Due to his athletic flexibility, the way he moved and large size for an Arabian, the nickname given him by observers became Red Dragon. Unfortunately, due to the shoulder injury, he developed structural deviations in both front legs which later photos show...
Comment from Gina_me


The horse is beautiful. You did a great job of showing us through the photo. I love how I can see the shine of the chestnut coat. Thank you for sharing.

 Comment Written 17-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 17-Sep-2018
    Thanks very much for your positive review. Eventually I will post a photo of this horse as an adult stallion, and perhaps a photo of his similar dam. Due to his athletic flexibility, the way he moved and large size for an Arabian, the nickname given him by observers became Red Dragon. Unfortunately, due to the shoulder injury, he developed structural deviations in both front legs which later photos show...
Comment from Dick Lee Shia


Indeed, a low vantage point greatly enhances the visual language & power dynamics of this image!

Sharply focused fine features & smooth textures.
Natural backdrop adds points to the overall impact!

Gorgeous illumination.

Good perspective & long depth of field...

Thanks for sharing...

 Comment Written 16-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 16-Sep-2018
    Thanks very much!
Comment from LynnAMarie


I love the photo but I've never heard of this horse. (Was active in the show world during this time) Bo Derek raised Andis though and I worked with Arabians. Although this photo looks like a Arab. Anyway, it's a nice photo, clear and well focused. Loved it.

 Comment Written 14-Sep-2018


reply by the author on 15-Sep-2018
    Did you know of Dorian Egyptian Arabians? My colt here was son of Dorian Ibn Shaw out of a Mi Tosk daughter, Mi Bright Song. The coloring comes from the Bask line on the dam's side. The reason you never heard of my horses was I was too busy both trying to protect them and working to earn a living without money behind me to promote my own horses -- and Gold had the accident that although he survived the surgery, made him go bench kneed. ( It was nice to own these horses, but owning high dollar horses was a rich man's game in those days! Also, the fact that they were so fine threatened the people I happened to work for at various places...) Bo had Arabs and Andalusians, and when I was there, she was trying to breed Paintalusions... Did you work or live in Santa Ynez? My email is daphneoberon@gmail.com if you want to chat horses... Thanks for the great review! Daphne Oberon
reply by LynnAMarie on 15-Sep-2018
    I worked at a farm here in Wisconsin and we had mostly Spanish bred, sounds like your guys were Egyptian bred lines mainly. We had three studs on the farm, Padrino (national Champion Side Saddle) and Esperanto (this was a cool stallion, one of the best I've had the pleasure to work with) http://www.spanisharabianhorsesociety.org/Archive_Esperanto.html
    There was a Wayne Newton Stallion on the farm also although he was only there a short time. He was leased. Can't remember his name. I showed a little here and there but mostly I did the behind scenes things. And yes, you are right, it's a rich mans sport. I don't have horses anymore mainly because I can't afford them now but back in the day Arabians were selling for top dollar.
reply by the author on 15-Sep-2018
    Interesting. The name Padrino sounds familiar. Excuse my eccentricity but I sometimes I tend to remember horses best by their conformation, and I remember him as having more of an apple rump than a flat topline. Apple rumps have always been fine with me, and in fact I think they function better because they help the horse get his back legs under him. I hope the far you worked at was a nice place. Because of my crazy background having just run away from my parents I had to take jobs wherever a farm was hiring, and got in a bad cycle of going from one high turn over farm to the next. Then when I got hired of manager of a racehorse farm in Ohio the two veterinarians were so impressed with my work that they gave me "six star references" for any animal related job I applied for. So I would stay until the politics or other issue drove me out and then go work for a new farm! (The owner of the racehorse farm poisoned my beautiful mare! I caught him at it.) !#@&!#$! Enjoy! Daphne Oberon